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In The News:  Page 4
Fairmont, WV Remembers Native Son, Johnnie Johnson

Page 1:  Bill Stalnaker Wins Arts and Humanities Music Award, October 2003
Page 2:  Blues Legend to Lead Fairmont, West Virginia Festival. July 2004
Page 3:  The Father of Rock 'N Roll, Johnnie Johnson, dies at 80. April 2005
Page 4:  Fairmont, WV Remembers Native Son, Johnnie Johnson. April 2005
Page 5:  Johnnie's New CD:  Johnnie Be Eighty. And Still Bad! Recorded Late 2004
Johnson's Hometown Remembers
WBOY, Channel 12, Clarksburg, Fairmont, & Morgantown, WV.
www.wboy.com/story.cfm?func=viewstory&storyid=2215
Blues legend Johnnie Johnson died Wednesday at his home in St. Louis.
Story by John Rodgers, Posted 4/14/2005.

The man known as "Johnnie Be Good" is being remembered fondly in his hometown of Fairmont. He was 80 years old. There's no doubt music ran in Johnnie Johnson's blood. Even school couldn't keep a young Johnnie Johnson away from his passion." "Just as he got to the piano, he'd jump out of line, stick his fingers and come across the piano. The teacher would say, ‘Johnnie, stay off that piano’,” said Johnnie’s childhood friend Asa Davidson. *Read the Full Article.

'He Just Loved the Music' Rock 'n' Roll Pioneer and Fairmont
Native Johnnie Johnson Dies in his Sleep at Age of 80

By Misty Poe - Times West Virginian, April 14, 2005
www.timeswv.com/articles/2005/04/14/news/news01.txt
FAIRMONT - Legendary blues artist and Rock 'n' Roll Hall of Famer Johnnie Johnson died Wednesday morning at his St. Louis home. He was 80. But to Fairmont, he was much more than the "Father of Rock & Roll" or the composer of songs like "Roll Over Beethoven" and "No Particular Place to Go." Johnson was her son. He was born in Fairmont on July 8, 1924, the son of a coal miner. Without the benefit of costly lessons, Johnson taught himself to play the piano as a 4-year-old by listening to jazz greats, big bands and country western on the radio. In 1943, he enlisted in the U.S. Marines and was one of the first 1,500 black men to do so. He later joined the company band, The Barracudas, and played the piano for U.S.O. shows next to some of the musical greats he heard on the radio as a child. In 1952, Johnson settled in St. Louis and formed the Johnnie Johnson Trio. That New Year's Eve, a band member fell ill and Johnson hired a young and inexperienced Chuck Berry to fill in at the last minute. The rest is musical history. .  *Read the Full Article.
Johnnie Johnson Never Forgot his Hometown
www.timeswv.com/articles/2005/04/17/opinion/opinion01.txt

It's hard to imagine a town having a "Hall of Fame" honoree establishing his talents elsewhere in the country and 95 percent of the people in his own hometown never hearing of him. That's pretty much the story of Fairmont native Johnnie Johnson, who left here early in life, first to join the U.S. Marines as one of the first 1,500 African Americans to do so and then settling in St. Louis where he became involved in the music world. Because of his talents, while in the Marines, he joined the company band and helped entertain troops at U.S.O. shows along with more famous musical stars that he had heard on the radio as a child. Johnson must have showed great musical skills at an extremely young age because he always claimed to have taught himself to play the piano at the age of 4.  *Read full article.

Johnnie Johnson will Still Be Playing Along
By Tammy Shriver - Times West Virginian, April 25, 2005
www.timeswv.com/articles/2005/04/25/columns/columns01.txt
As I sat down at my computer on April 14 to start my shift at work, I pulled up the list of stories for the following day's paper. It's a task I do daily to see if everything is on track and what is needed. But that day the story list stopped me in my tracks and a soft "Oh, no" was all I could say. It was there that I learned the Johnnie Johnson had passed away. It was at that point that the memories started flooding back. Now for those of you who are not Johnson fans, you will never understand the greatness of this man. Not his talent, nor the fact that he was in the Rock ' N' Roll Hall of Fame or the fact that he has played with the best and was in fact himself the best. That is not what made Johnnie special to me. It was Johnnie the man.  *Read the Full Article.
Candlelight Service to Memorialize the Life of the Late
Johnnie Johnson in his hometown of Fairmont, West Virginia 
www.timeswv.com/articles/2005/04/22/columns/columns01.txt
April 22, 2005. Tonight's the night of the candlelight service to memorialize the life of the late Johnnie Johnson. It's being held by the Johnnie Johnson Blues and Jazz Society at 8 p.m. at Palatine Park with the Rev. Richard Bowyer presiding.
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Page 1:  Bill Stalnaker Wins Arts and Humanities Music Award, October 2003
Page 2:  Blues Legend to Lead Fairmont, West Virginia Festival. July 2004
Page 3:  The Father of Rock 'N Roll, Johnnie Johnson, dies at 80. April 2005
Page 4:  Fairmont, WV Remembers Native Son, Johnnie Johnson. April 2005
Page 5:  Johnnie's New CD:  Johnnie Be Eighty. And Still Bad! Recorded Late 2004


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